University of California, Agriculture & Natural Resources
University of California, Agriculture & Natural Resources
University of California, Agriculture & Natural Resources
University of California
University of California, Agriculture & Natural Resources

Client Stories

Beneficial insects help vineyards in a way chemicals cannot

Adult Anagrus sp. male, a parasite of the grape leafhopper
In the 1970s and 1980s, grape vineyards were commonly treated heavily with insecticides. Even then, the leafhopper remained a very prominent pest—workers regularly complained of leafhopper populations so thick they made it impossible to see during harvest. UCCE responded by introducing and promoting an approach to pest control that relies less on chemicals, the first Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program for grapes. By using popular IPM practices such as beneficial insects and mating disruption in their vineyards, today’s growers are achieving much more effective pest control. Insecticide applications for leafhopper control have become the exception, not the rule.

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